Two Degrees In Bebop

Two Degrees in Bebop is a New York/Chicago-based music blog.
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Posts tagged "rock n' roll"

Rocker Dave Grohl and songstress Norah Jones perform a pleasant rendition of “Maybe I’m Amazed” to a groovin’ Paul McCartney at the Kennedy Center last November. Notice how Norah Jones changes the pronouns in her verse to reflect her womanly perspective.

When one of our favorite bands from the present plays one of our favorite songs from our past, we can hardly sit still. Case in point: this cover of “Flagpole Sitta” by the rowdy Rhode Island rock band Deer Tick, who grunge up and groove out on this late ’90s anthem from Harvey Danger. 

Deer Tick
“Flagpole Sitta”

"I hope they don’t think we’re a rock ‘n’ roll outfit" - Classic.

This week marks the 50th anniversary of The Rolling Stones first ever gig at the Marquee Club in London, England. Wow.

In “Life” Keith Richards had this to say about the summer of 1962: “This band was very fragile; no one was looking for this thing to fly. I mean, we’re anti-pop, we’re anti-ballroom, all we want to is be the best blues band in London and show the fuckers what’s what because we know we can do it. And these weird little bunches of people would come in and support us. We didn’t even know where they came from or why, or how they found out where we were. We didn’t think we were ever going to do anything much except turn people on to Muddy Waters and Bo Diddley and Jimmy Reed.” We had no intention of being anything ourselves. The idea of making a record seemed to be totally out of the picture. Our job at that time was idealistic. We were unpaid promoters for Chicago Blues.”

From London club blues band to the biggest Rock ‘n’ Roll band in the world, we proudly salute The Rolling Stones and all of the music they have brought to this world.

The Rolling Stones

"Not Fade Away"

The word “legendary” does not even begin to describe Donald “Duck” Dunn and his place in musical history. Memphis-born Dunn joined Booker T and the MG’s in the 1960’s. Booker and his band quickly became the house band for Stax records. Stax was home to Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding, Sam & Dave, and a host of others soul acts who constantly turned out hit after hit after hit in the mid 60’s. He has performed on dozens of hit songs and 100’s of lesser-know songs. Dunn was critical in helping define the ‘Memphis soul’ sound and left a giant mark on popular music as a whole. Dunn moved from Memphis to LA in 1970 where he laid his soulful bass lines down with artists like Rod Stewart, Tom Petty, Peter Frampton, Jerry Lee Lewis and Robert Palmer. During a particularly rowdy 1970’s session with Jerry Lee Lewis for his southern-soul record “Southern Roots”, Dunn stated:
"It was just craziness!" concurs Duck. "All it needed was Keith Richard! One song I particularly remember was When A Man Loves A Woman. If you listen to that record, he’s incredible. And that was one take. Jerry Lee is crazy, he’s outrageous, but I think he’s the best rock’n’roller that ever lived."Later that decade he got a personal invitation from Dan Akroyd and John Belushi to join the Blues Brother band for the movie “The Blues Brothers” which allowed him to play with Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin among others. In the 1990’s he played with Eric Clapton and in the 2000’s Neil Young.
Duck Dunn was one of the most prolific and greatest musicians to ever come from Tennessee. One who will be remembered forever.
Here is a personal 2DiB Duck Dunn favorite. He recorded this song with Eddie Floyd while still at Stax. Soul as it is supposed to be.
Eddie Floyd “Girl I Love You”

The word “legendary” does not even begin to describe Donald “Duck” Dunn and his place in musical history. Memphis-born Dunn joined Booker T and the MG’s in the 1960’s. Booker and his band quickly became the house band for Stax records. Stax was home to Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding, Sam & Dave, and a host of others soul acts who constantly turned out hit after hit after hit in the mid 60’s. He has performed on dozens of hit songs and 100’s of lesser-know songs. Dunn was critical in helping define the ‘Memphis soul’ sound and left a giant mark on popular music as a whole.

Dunn moved from Memphis to LA in 1970 where he laid his soulful bass lines down with artists like Rod Stewart, Tom Petty, Peter Frampton, Jerry Lee Lewis and Robert Palmer. During a particularly rowdy 1970’s session with Jerry Lee Lewis for his southern-soul record “Southern Roots”, Dunn stated:

"It was just craziness!" concurs Duck. "All it needed was Keith Richard! One song I particularly remember was When A Man Loves A Woman. If you listen to that record, he’s incredible. And that was one take. Jerry Lee is crazy, he’s outrageous, but I think he’s the best rock’n’roller that ever lived."

Later that decade he got a personal invitation from Dan Akroyd and John Belushi to join the Blues Brother band for the movie “The Blues Brothers” which allowed him to play with Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin among others. In the 1990’s he played with Eric Clapton and in the 2000’s Neil Young.

Duck Dunn was one of the most prolific and greatest musicians to ever come from Tennessee. One who will be remembered forever.

Here is a personal 2DiB Duck Dunn favorite. He recorded this song with Eddie Floyd while still at Stax. Soul as it is supposed to be.

Eddie Floyd “Girl I Love You”

Before Dan Auerbach was one half of The Black Keys, he was one third of a bluesy band from northern Ohio called The Barnburners. On their only release (the 6-song EP The Raw Boogie) the trio tackled Junior Kimbrough’s staple “Meet Me in the City”.

The BarnBurners “Meet me in the City”

Oklahoma newcomer John Fullbright’s new album “from the ground up” is an amazing display of American music. He can sing, he can play, he can write damn good songs and he is barely old enough to drink beer. Listen to “Satan and St. Paul”. Conversley, if you are feeling a bit more upbeat go check out album opener “Gawd Above”.
John Fullbright “Satan and St. Paul”
(Photo: Richard Webb)

Oklahoma newcomer John Fullbright’s new album “from the ground up” is an amazing display of American music. He can sing, he can play, he can write damn good songs and he is barely old enough to drink beer. Listen to “Satan and St. Paul”. Conversley, if you are feeling a bit more upbeat go check out album opener “Gawd Above”.

John Fullbright “Satan and St. Paul”

(Photo: Richard Webb)

The Grease Band, who created the iconic and magic sounds behind many Joe Cocker songs in the late ’60s (including his Woodstock performance) released two albums in the early ’70s with some magic of their own. 
The Grease Band “Let It Be Gone”

The Grease Band, who created the iconic and magic sounds behind many Joe Cocker songs in the late ’60s (including his Woodstock performance) released two albums in the early ’70s with some magic of their own.

The Grease Band “Let It Be Gone”